Comprehensive Safety Awareness Training Course Bundle (Includes 97 Courses)

   

This bundle includes 97 courses, regularly priced at $12.95 each...now for only $69.99 total!

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace. No person should ever have to be injured, become ill, or die for a paycheck.

The importance of training your employees – both new and experienced — cannot be overemphasized. Effective training of new employees results in employees who: Know what they’re doing Save time Have a good feeling about the company Get off to a good start. Retraining of employees provides for continued  "insurance" against accident and incidents.

To assist employers, safety and health professionals, training directors and others with a need to know, OSHA’s training-related General Awareness training courses have been collected in this online training bundle. Topical General Awareness Requirements for training are included in this group of courses as well as industry specific  training.

Training in the safe way for workers to do their jobs well is an investment that will pay back over and over again in fewer injuries and illnesses, better morale, lower insurance premiums and more.

It is a good idea to keep a record of all safety and health training. Documentation can also supply an answer to one of the first questions an incident investigator will ask: “Did the employee receive adequate training to do the job?”

* Comprehensive General Awareness Training Curriculum for your firm's safety program.
* One Purchase and you have every course you need to train multiple employees.
* An annual fixed cost per trainee for solid budget planning.

$69.99
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Included Courses

18-wheel-straight-truck-security-inspection-procedures-v2-6-course

18 Wheel & Straight Truck Security Inspection Procedures V2.6 Course

Every year, during the first week of June and usually on a Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, the CVSA (Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance) holds the annual sting operation code named “Roadcheck”. During the 72-hour event approximately ten thousand federal, state, provincial and local truck and bus inspectors hold inspection operations throughout the USA, Canada and Mexico using North American Standard Level I Inspection Procedures.


access-to-medical-records-v2-16-course-1

Access to Medical Records V2.16 Course

1910.1020(a) -The purpose of this course is to explain to employees and their designated representatives a right of access to relevant exposure and medical records; and to provide representatives of the Assistant Secretary a right of access to these records in order to fulfill responsibilities under the Occupational Safety and Health Act.


accident-investigation-v2-16-course-1

Accident Investigation V2.16 Course

Thousands of accidents occur throughout the United States every day. The failure of people, equipment, supplies, or surroundings to behave or react as expected causes most of them. Accident investigations determine how and why these failures occur. By using the information gained through an investigation, a similar, or perhaps more disastrous, accident may be prevented. It is important to conduct accident investigations with prevention in mind. There are currently no specific standards for accident investigation.


active-shooter-v2-16-course-1

Active Shooter V2.16 Course

Active shooter incidents are often unpredictable and evolve quickly. In the midst of the chaos, anyone can play an integral role in mitigating the impacts of an active shooter incident. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) aims to enhance preparedness through a "whole community" approach by providing  products, tools, and resources to help you prepare for and respond to an active shooter incident. To access the most applicable information, please select one of the provided categories.


aerial-lift-safety-v2-16-course-1

Aerial Lift Safety V2.16 Course

Aerial Lifts: Unless otherwise provided in this section, aerial lifts acquired for use on or after January 22, 1973 shall be designed and constructed in conformance with the applicable requirements of the American National Standards for "Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms," ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969, may not be used after January 1, 1976, unless they shall have been modified so as to conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969.


anhydrous-ammonia-safety-v2-6-course-1

Anhydrous Ammonia Safety V2.6 Course

Ammonia is considered a high health hazard because it is corrosive to the skin, eyes, and lungs. Exposure to 300 ppm is immediately dangerous to life and health. Ammonia is also flammable at concentrations of approximately 15% to 28% by volume in air. When mixed with lubricating oils, its flammable concentration range is increased. It can explode if released in an enclosed space with a source of ignition present, or if a vessel containing anhydrous ammonia is exposed to fire. Fortunately, ammonia has a low odor threshold (20 ppm), so most people will seek relief at much lower concentrations. Ammonia refrigeration is addressed in specific standards for the general industry.


back-safety-v2-16-course-1

Back Safety V2.16 Course

Back injuries can be extremely painful and long-lasting. OSHA reports that "back strain due to overexertion represents one of the largest segments of employee injuries in the American workplace. Only the common cold accounts for more lost days of work." The National Safety Council has stated that overexertion is the cause of about 31 percent of all disabling work injuries. It's important to know what types of acts are likely to cause back strain and how to work in ways to reduce the risk. General Duty Clause: Workplace hazards that can result in back injuries are subject to OSHA citations under the General Duty Clause of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.


battery-safety-v2-6-course-1

Battery Safety V2.6 Course

OSHA - Batteries and battery charging. Batteries provide a portable – and usually safe – source of electrical power for countless applications. From tiny cells used in wristwatches to industrial-size utility backups, batteries keep things working for us. There are some hazards associated with batteries, however. The chemical reactions required to generate electricity involve toxic and explosive substances, harmful to humans and the environment. Large batteries can deliver fatal electrical shock.


behavior-based-safety-v2-16-course-1

Behavior Based Safety V2.16 Course

SINCE it first rose to popularity in the early 1990s, behavior-based safety (BBS) has become an established and widely respected tool for safety improvement. While not without its critics, BBS has clearly had its successes, among them introducing new tools that allow greater precision in making improvements in safety systems and equipment. As BBS continues to evolve as an EH&S tool, many are now asking how to build on the approach for even greater effectiveness in safety management. What does the future of BBS hold for organizations currently using it, and how does the experience of the past 20 years inform our approach to EH&S going forward?


bloodborne-pathogens-v2-16-course

Bloodborne Pathogens V2.16 Course

1910.1030 - Blood borne Pathogens: The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard (29 CFR 1910.1030) requires employers to eliminate, or at least minimize, the hazards of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. The standard requires employers of workers at risk of occupational exposure to blood or OPIM to develop a written Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan. In addition, such employers must implement a combination of safety measures including engineering and work practice controls, personal protective equipment, employee training, and offering potentially exposed workers the vaccination against hepatitis B


butadiene-safety-awareness-v2-6-course-1

Butadiene Safety Awareness V2.6 Course

1,3-Butadiene ranks 36th in the most produced chemicals in the United States. Three billion pounds per year are produced in the United States and 12 billion globally. 1,3-butadiene is produced through the processing of petroleum and is mainly used in the production of synthetic rubber, but is also found in smaller amounts in plastics and fuel. Exposure to 1,3-butadiene mainly occurs in the workplace, including the following industries: synthetic elastomer (rubber and latex) production, petroleum refining, secondary lead smelting, water treatment, agricultural fungicides, production of raw material for nylon, and the use of fossil fuels. Exposure can also occur from automobile exhaust; polluted air and water near chemical, plastic or rubber facilities; cigarette smoke; and ingestion of foods that are contaminated from plastic or rubber containers.


carcinogens-v2-16-course-1

Carcinogens V2.16 Course

1910.1003 - Carcinogens - Millions of U.S. workers are exposed to chemical materials that could be carcinogenic. If any of your workers are in this group, train them to take these steps to protect themselves from carcinogen exposure.


caustic-soda-solutions-awareness-v2-6-course-1

Caustic Soda Solutions Awareness V2.6 Course

Caustic Soda Solutions: Potential symptoms: Eye, skin mucous membrane irritation; sore throat, cough, labored breathing, shortness of breath; pulmonary edema, pneumonitis; eye, skin burns; redness, pain, blisters; blurred vision, blindness (from contact with liquid); temporary loss of hair; INGES ACUTE: Burning sensation; nausea, vomiting; abdominal pain, diarrhea; swelling of the larynx to the point of suffocation; shock or collapse.


cold-weather-safety-v2-16-course-1

Cold Weather Safety V2.16 Course

Cold Weather Safety - When winter is locked in around us, OSHA and other experts offers tips on things an employer can do to protect workers from cold weather. But given that you can’t monitor everyone all the time, there’s only so much the organization can do in any safety situation. In the end, the responsibility for safety always falls on the individual worker. --Understand the risks of cold weather. Among the most serious are frostbite and hypothermia. --Know when these threats may be affecting you. For frostbite, that means feeling cold, then numb, with tingling, aching or brief pain. Frostbitten skin also may appear white or grayish, and may blister. Hypothermia is signaled by chills, shivering, and feelings of drowsiness and confusion.


confined-space-awareness-v2-16-course-1

Confined Space Awareness V2.16 Course

1910.146 -Confined Space:Understanding and applying OSHA standards is at the heart of any safety and health program. This white paper is a review of permit-required confined space (29 CFR 1910.146), a widely applied and frequently cited standard. The article aims to provide a helpful overview of the requirements, as well as some compliance tips to give your programs a boost, or to help you get one off the ground. There's nothing new about confined spaces or their hazards. In Roman times, the emperor Trajan sentenced criminals to clean sewers, an occupation known to be particularly dangerous.


crane-safety-v2-16-course-1

Crane Safety V2.16 Course

Crane, Derrick, and Hoist Safety (29 CFR 1910) - Moving large, heavy loads is crucial to today's manufacturing and construction industries. Much technology has been developed for these operations, including careful training and extensive workplace precautions. There are significant safety issues to be considered, both for the operators of the diverse "lifting" devices, and for workers in proximity to them. This page is a starting point for finding information about these devices, including elevators and conveyors, and their operation. Crane, derrick, and hoist safety hazards are addressed in specific standards for the general industry, marine terminals, longshoring, gear certification, and the construction industry.


disaster-management-v2-16-course-1

Disaster Management V2.16 Course

Disaster Management: Emergencies can create a variety of hazards for workers in the impacted area. Preparing before an emergency incident plays a vital role in ensuring that employers and workers have the necessary equipment, know where to go, and know how to keep themselves safe when an emergency occurs. These Emergency Preparedness and Response pages provide information on how to prepare and train for emergencies and the hazards to be aware of when an emergency occurs. The pages provide information for employers and workers across industries, and for workers who will be responding to the emergency.


discrimination-and-harassment-v2-16-course-1

Discrimination and Harassment V2.16 Course

Unlawful harassment is a form of discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other federal authority.   Unwelcome verbal or physical conduct based on race, color, religion, sex (whether or not of a sexual nature and including same-gender harassment and gender identity harassment), national origin, age (40 and over), disability (mental or physical), sexual orientation, or retaliation (sometimes collectively referred to as “legally protected characteristics”) can constitute harassment.


driving-safety-v2-16-course-1

Driving Safety V2.16 Course

Driving Safety - According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Table A-6. Fatal occupational injuries resulting from transportation incidents and homicides by occupation, All United States, 2010, more than 1,766 deaths a year result from occupational transportation incidents. That number is more than 38 percent of the 4,547 annual number of fatalities from occupational injuries. While fatal highway incidents remained the most frequent type of fatal work-related event, transportation incidents decreased slightly in 2010 relative to 2009, but still accounted for nearly 2 out of every 5 fatal work injuries in 2010.


driving-skills-v2-16-course-1

Driving Skills V2.16 Course

Driving in traffic is more than just knowing how to operate the mechanisms which control the vehicle; it requires knowing how to apply the rules of the road (which govern safe and efficient sharing with other users). An effective driver also has an intuitive understanding of the basics of vehicle handling and can drive responsibly.


drug-alcohol-employee-v2-16-course-1

Drug & Alcohol Employee V2.16 Course

Drug & Alcohol - The vast majority of drug users are employed, and when they arrive for work, they don't leave their problems at the door. Of the 17.2 million illicit drug users aged 18 or older in 2005, 12.9 million (74.8 percent) were employed either full or part time. Furthermore, research indicates that between 10 and 20 percent of the nation's workers who die on the job test positive for alcohol or other drugs. In fact, industries with the highest rates of drug use are the same as those at a high risk for occupational injuries, such as construction, mining, manufacturing and wholesale.


electrical-safety-unqualified-v2-16-course-1

Electrical Safety Unqualified V2.16 Course

Electrical Safety: -STD 01-16-007: Understanding the electrical safety for unqualified workers plan at your facility is crucial to your safety. Unqualified workers, in this case, are machine operators, operators of powered industrial trucks, construction workers, and other personnel who are not specifically qualified to perform electrical work, but who need to know essential information about the hazards of electricity and how to prevent serious injury.


emergency-planning-v2-16-course-1

Emergency Planning V2.16 Course

1910.38 - Emergency Action Plan: Having an action plan is an important part of emergency preparedness. However, merely writing one isn’t enough. You also have to make sure it is workable.


emergency-response-v2-16-course-1

Emergency Response V2.16 Course

Emergency Response: OSHA and its State Plan partners help set and implement national safety and health standards for emergency responders. Foremost among these standards is the Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response standard of 29 CFR 1910.120(q).


environmental-awareness-v2-16-course-1

Environmental Awareness V2.16 Course

Environmental Awareness: In March 2011, EPA finalized rules to regulate emissions of air toxics, including mercury, from large industrial boilers and solid waste incinerators. EPA decided to keep the standards from going into effect, however, because we wanted to make sure the rules reflected new information and additional public comments. In December 2011, EPA re-proposed the rules that reflect new information and we expect to finalize them later this year. EPA and the Obama Administration are committed to these standards and the significant health benefits for our children and our families.


ergonomics-awareness-safety-training-v2-16-course-1

Ergonomics Awareness Safety Training V2.16 Course

Ergonomics is the science of fitting the job to the worker doing that job. The goal of ergonomics is to reduce a worker's exposure to musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) risk factors by changing the design of a workstation or the way a job is performed, allowing workers to rotate through different jobs, or providing personal protective equipment (PPE). While the Clinton-era ergonomics standard was revoked, OSHA will cite ergonomics violations under the General Duty Clause.


eye-safety-general-awareness-v2-16-course-1

Eye Safety General Awareness V2.16 Course

1910.133- Eye and face protection.This eye protection safety training course will teach employees the basics of eye protection on the job, including identifying the potential work areas and activities that could cause injury to your eyes and understanding how to prevent those injuries. Also covered is the use, maintenance, and inspection of protective eyewear as well as the use of appropriate first aid for emergencies while at work.


fall-prevention-safety-v2-16-course-1

Fall Prevention Safety V2.16 Course

Fall Protection: In 2008, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that fatal work injuries involving falls decreased 20 percent in 2008 after a sharp increase in 2007. The 847 fatal falls in 2007 was the series high. Identifying fall hazards and deciding how best to protect workers is the first step in reducing or eliminating fall hazards. Occupational fatalities caused by falls remain a serious public health problem. The US Department of Labor (DOL) lists falls as one of the leading causes of traumatic occupational death, accounting for eight percent of all occupational fatalities from trauma. Any time a worker is at a height of four feet or more, the worker is at risk and needs to be protected. Fall protection must be provided at four feet in general industry, five feet in maritime and six feet in construction. However, regardless of the fall distance, fall protection must be provided when working over dangerous equipment and machinery.


fatigue-at-work-v2-16-course-1

Fatigue at Work V2.16 Course

Fatigue: The signs are clearly seen on the face. The eyes look tired and sleepy, forehead is creased, the head is rests on the hands and there are files piled on the desk waiting to be looked at. If you find yourself in this way more often than not; you are suffering from fatigue at work. This feeling of chronic tiredness, frequent headaches, muscle weakness and moodiness are symptoms of fatigue.


fire-prevention-and-safety-v2-16-course-1

Fire Prevention and Safety V2.16 Course

1910.39 -Fire safety is important business. National Fire Prevention Week is intended to focus on the importance of fire safety in the home, in schools and at work. But workplace fire safety is the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) principal focus and saving lives and preventing injuries due to fire is a key concern. According to National Safety Council figures, losses due to workplace fires in 1988 totaled $3.1 billion. Of the more than 5,000 persons who lost their lives due to fires in 1988, the National Safety Council estimates 360 were workplace deaths. When OSHA conducts workplace inspections, it checks to see whether employers are complying with OSHA standards for fire safety. OSHA standards require employers to provide proper exits, fire fighting equipment, emergency plans, and employee training to prevent fire deaths and injuries in the workplace.


first-aid-general-awareness-training-v2-16-course-1

First Aid General Awareness Training V2.16 Course

1910.151 -  First aid includes any one-time treatment and follow-up for observation of minor injuries, including cuts, abrasions, bruises, first-degree burns, sprains, and splinters. Injuries or illnesses requiring only first aid are commonplace. One or more workers should be properly trained to administer basic first aid, including CPR. Workplaces should have a well-stocked first-aid kit and at least one or more employee assigned the responsibility for administering or coordinating first-aid treatments.


flammable-and-combustible-liquids-v2-6-course-1

Flammable and Combustible Liquids V2.6 Course

1910.106 -There are an estimated 575,000 existing chemical products, and hundreds of new ones being introduced annually. Many of these chemical products contain properties that are flammable or combustible. This poses a serious problem for exposed workers and their employer. The OSHA Flammable and combustible liquids Standard establishes uniform requirements to ensure that the hazards associated the storage, handling, and use of all chemicals used in U.S. workplaces are evaluated, and that this hazard information is transmitted to all affected workers.


forklift-classroom-v2-16-course-1

Forklift - Classroom V2.16 Course

1910.178 - Each year, tens of thousands of injuries related to powered industrial trucks (PIT), or forklifts, occur in US workplaces. Many employees are injured when lift trucks are inadvertently driven off loading docks, lifts fall between docks and an unsecured trailer, they are struck by a lift truck, or when they fall while on elevated pallets and tines. Most incidents also involve property damage, including damage to overhead sprinklers, racking, pipes, walls, and machinery. Unfortunately, most employee injuries and property damage can be attributed to lack of safe operating procedures, lack of safety-rule enforcement, and insufficient or inadequate training.


gfci-awareness-training-v2-6-course-1

GFCI Awareness Training V2.6 Course

CFR 1926 - OSHA and many state safety laws have helped to provide safe working areas for electricians. Individuals can work safely on electrical equipment with today's safeguards and recommended work practices. In addition, an understanding of the principles of electricity is gained. Ask supervisors when in doubt about a procedure. Report any unsafe conditions, equipment, or work practices as soon as possible. Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) is an electrical device which protects personnel by detecting potentially hazardous ground faults and quickly disconnecting power from the circuit. A potentially dangerous ground fault is any amount of current above the level that may deliver a dangerous shock. Any current over 8 mA is considered potentially dangerous depending on the path the current takes, the amount of time exposed to the shock, and the physical condition of the person receiving the shock.


globally-harmonized-system-of-classification-and-labeling-of-chemicals-ghs-v2-6-course

Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals [GHS] V2.6 (Course)

GHS: The GHS is an acronym for The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals. The GHS is a system for standardizing and harmonizing the classification and labeling of chemicals.


guidance-on-simultaneous-operations-simops-v2-6-course-1

Guidance on Simultaneous Operations SIMOPS V2.6 Course

SIMOPS: Doing two or more things at the same time can be difficult under any circumstances. The risks associated with simultaneous operations (SIMOPS) in support of oil and gas exploration and production, for example, related construction and survey activities, can be great and potentially dangerous.


hand-and-power-tool-safety-v2-16-course-1

Hand and Power Tool Safety V2.16 Course

Hand and power tools are a common part of our everyday lives and are present in nearly every industry. These tools help us to easily perform tasks that otherwise would be difficult or impossible. However, these simple tools can be hazardous and have the potential for causing severe injuries when used or maintained improperly. Special attention toward hand and power tool safety is necessary in order to reduce or eliminate these hazards.


hand-wrist-and-finger-safety-v2-16-course-1

Hand Wrist and Finger Safety V2.16 Course

Hand Wrist & Finger - General requirements. Employers shall select and require employees to use appropriate hand protection when employees' hands are exposed to hazards such as those from skin absorption of harmful substances; severe cuts or lacerations; severe abrasions; punctures; chemical burns; thermal burns; and harmful temperature extremes.


hazard-recoginition-v2-16-course-1

Hazard Recoginition V2.16 Course

Hazard Recognition: Pertains to all areas of work.


hazcom-rtk-v2-16-course

HAZCOM RTK V2.16 (Course)

Hazard Communications - In order to ensure chemical safety in the workplace, information must be available about the identities and hazards of the chemicals. OSHA's Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires the development and dissemination of such information: Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to evaluate the hazards of the chemicals they produce or import, and Prepare labels and material safety data sheets (MSDSs) to convey the hazard information to their downstream customers. All employers with hazardous chemicals in their workplaces must have labels and MSDSs for their exposed workers, and train them to handle the chemicals appropriately.


hazmat-v2-16-course

HAZMAT V2.16 (Course)

HazMat - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires all employees who potentially will work around or be exposed to hazardous materials (Hazmat) be trained before they begin working. Training includes an explanation of the hazards, how to handle hazardous materials, how to use personal protective equipment (PPE), how to minimize risks from hazards and medical surveillance requirements (monitoring and recognition of exposure symptoms). To aid trainers, OSHA has provided Publication 2254, Training Requirements in OSHA Standards and Training Guidelines.


hazwoper-overview-v2-16-course-1

HAZWOPER Overview V2.16 Course

Introduction to HazWoper - The purpose of this unit is to give trainees a general understanding of what “HAZWOPER” means, the purpose of the OSHA HAZWOPER Standard, and the requirements associated with safety and health training and medical surveillance. At the conclusion of this unit, trainees will know what “HAZWOPER” means and the purpose of the OSHA HAZWOPER Standard. They will also have a general understanding of chemical hazards, control measures, and the basic requirements of emergency response training.


health-wellness-v2-16-course-1

Health Wellness V2.16 Course

OSHA Safety & Health: Believe it or not workplace wellness is extremely important. The healthier your employees are mentally and physical, the more productivity you will receive from them. Workplace wellness affects everyone. If a person is physical ill their productivity will slow. They will in turn probably be grumpy and this could affect the other employees and possibly their work too. They can also infect the rest of your staff with their illness which could result in call outs and even less productivity. Workplace wellness does not just imply physical wellness. It also carries over to mental wellness too. Stressful situations, lack of sleep, problems at home can all affect a person’s work. In order to have a healthy business you must have a healthy staff.


hearing-conservation-v2-16-course-1

Hearing Conservation V2.16 Course

Hearing Conservation - Every year, approximately 30 million people in the United States are occupationally exposed to hazardous noise. Noise-related hearing loss has been listed as one of the most prevalent occupational health concerns in the United States for more than 25 years. Thousands of workers every year suffer from preventable hearing loss due to high workplace noise levels. Since 2004, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that nearly 125,000 workers have suffered significant, permanent hearing loss. In 2009 alone, BLS reported more than 21,000 hearing loss cases.


heat-stress-v2-16-course

Heat Stress V2.16 (Course)

Heat Exhauston (Stress) - Operations involving high air temperatures, radiant heat sources, high humidity, direct physical contact with hot objects, or strenuous physical activities have a high potential for inducing heat stress in employees engaged in such operations. Such places include: iron and steel foundries, nonferrous foundries, brick-firing and ceramic plants, glass products facilities, rubber products factories, electrical utilities (particularly boiler rooms), bakeries, confectioneries, commercial kitchens, laundries, food canneries, chemical plants, mining sites, smelters, and steam tunnels.


hot-work-v2-16-course-1

Hot Work V2.16 Course

Hot Work - Hot work is any work that involves burning, welding, using fire- or spark-producing tools, or that produces a source of ignition.  


hydrogen-sulfide-awareness-v2-16-course-1

Hydrogen Sulfide Awareness V2.16 Course

API RP 49 - H2S training is required for anyone working in the oilfield or petrochemical industry. Hydrogen Sulfide training is required for all workers involved in oil exploration, production and refining. In order to work safely around hydrogen sulfide, you must be aware of its properties and characteristics. This H2S Training program teaches how to recognize when Hydrogen Sulfide is present in the work area and take necessary precautions to work with Hydrogen Sulfide safely. This H2S training helps fulfill the training requirements of API Recommended Practice 49, ANSI Z390.1 and other regulatory standards. This employee safety training program uses comprehensive online exams assure mastery of all safety concepts in this H2S training course. Improve your H2S knowledge with this online safety training course.


introduction-to-arc-flash-hazards-awareness-v2-16-course-1

Introduction to Arc-Flash Hazards Awareness V2.16 Course

OSHA 29 CFR-1910: OSHA considers arc flash to be a "recognized hazard" for which appropriate safety standards (most importantly, NFPA 70E) exist. While OSHA does not mandate that employers follow NFPA 70E, failure to do so may result in a citation in the event of an arc flash incident which NFPA 70E compliance could have prevented. In addition, various states have OSHA state plans which mandate compliance with NFPA 70E. Employers should check the relevant state codes, as considerable variation exists.


introduction-to-osha-v2-16-course-1

Introduction to OSHA V2.16 Course

OSHA (wiki) :The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is an agency of the United States Department of Labor. It was created by Congress of the United States under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, signed by President Richard M. Nixon, on December 29, 1970. Its mission is to prevent work-related injuries, illnesses, and occupational fatality by issuing and enforcing standards for workplace safety and health. It was also established to create a better workplace for all workers and to ensure the safety of everyone by making and enforcing certain standards that are needed to protect the people. The agency is headed by a Deputy Assistant Secretary of Labor.


journey-management-v2-16-course-1

Journey Management V2.16 Course

Planning and carrying out road transport missions safely requires a thorough understanding and strict adherence to safety rules established by an Organisation. The challenge is to coordinate and monitor each step in this process so that missions are managed competently from beginning to end.


jsea-v2-16-course-1

JSEA V2.16 Course

In the workplace, one simple human error can lead to a severe accident or injury. It takes a trained mind to evaluate the relationship between the worker, the task, the work area, the tools, and the equipment. A job hazard analysis allows supervisors to find the potential hazards before they occur. Comprehensive job hazard analyses can not only reduce injury and illness rates, but can also save companies money in workers’ compensation costs and downtime due to accidents


land-transportation-v2-16-course-1

Land Transportation V2.16 Course

Driving Safety - According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Table A-6. Fatal occupational injuries resulting from transportation incidents and homicides by occupation, All United States, 2010, more than 1,766 deaths a year result from occupational transportation incidents. That number is more than 38 percent of the 4,547 annual number of fatalities from occupational injuries. While fatal highway incidents remained the most frequent type of fatal work-related event, transportation incidents decreased slightly in 2010 relative to 2009, but still accounted for nearly 2 out of every 5 fatal work injuries in 2010.


leadership-skills-v2-16-course-1

Leadership Skills V2.16 Course

Leadership is the process of influencing others to achieve the organizational goals.  Leadership is an interaction between the leader, the followers, and the situation.


lockout-tagout-v2-16-course-1

Lockout Tagout V2.16 Course

Lockout Tagout - Approximately 3 million workers service equipment and face the greatest risk of injury if lockout/tagout is not properly implemented. Compliance with the lockout/tagout standard (29 CFR 1910.147) prevents an estimated 120 fatalities and 50,000 injuries each year. Workers injured on the job from exposure to hazardous energy lose an average of 24 workdays for recuperation. In a study conducted by the United Auto Workers (UAW), 20% of the fatalities (83 of 414) that occurred among their members between 1973 and 1995 were attributed to inadequate hazardous energy control procedures specifically, lockout/tagout procedures.


machine-guards-v2-16-course-1

Machine Guards V2.16 Course

Machine Guards - Moving machine parts have the potential to cause severe workplace injuries, such as crushed fingers or hands, amputations, burns, or blindness. Safeguards are essential for protecting workers from these preventable injuries. Any machine part, function, or process that may cause injury must be safeguarded. When the operation of a machine or accidental contact injure the operator or others in the vicinity, the hazards must be eliminated or controlled. This page contains general information on the various hazards of mechanical motion and techniques for protecting workers.


mobile-equipment-and-flagger-safety-v2-16-course-1

Mobile Equipment and Flagger Safety V2.16 Course

Employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace for their workers. OSHA's role is to assure the safety and health of America's workers by setting and enforcing standards; providing training, outreach, and education; establishing partnerships; and encouraging continual improvement in workplace safety and health.


near-miss-v2-16-course-1

Near Miss V2.16 Course

OSHA doesn't really get into explaining the definition of near miss. But insurance company and safety experts mostly agree on one thing: that just because on one got hurt,  the concept of  "no-harm, no-foul" does not apply.  Instead, the thinking is that near misses represent a serious problem - and an opportunity.  A problem that they were allowed to happen, but an opportunity to learn from them and address the underlying problems.


new-hire-orientation-v2-16-course-1

New Hire Orientation V2.16 Course

NEO: The OSHA Office of Statistics reports that 40 percent of employees injured at work have been on the job less than 1 year. New hires need to be made aware of how serious safety training is right from the start. While there is no specific requirement for new hire safety orientation, many training requirements explicitly state that training must be provided to new employees.


norm-awareness-v2-16-course-1

NORM Awareness V2.16 Course

NORM - Under various circumstances, the radionuclides, primarily from the uranium and thorium decay series, can contaminate the environment to the extent that they pose real or potential public health risks. The investigation and regulatory control of the impacts of most of these sources have been overlooked by federal and state agencies in the past, while stringent controls were placed on X-ray and other man-made sources of radiation. This lack of strict controls has been due, in part, to the fact that the federal government has limited jurisdiction over TENR, and control was previously left up to the states, which often times did not have adequate programs or staff to deal with the problem. TENR is a subset of a larger grouping referred to as naturally-occurring radioactive materials (NORM), Regulations to deal with NORM are being developed by a task force of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and have been through six drafts to date.


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Occupational Health V2.16 Course

With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.


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Pinch Points V2.16 Course

Pinch Points - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulates workplace safety around pinch points to reduce occupational injuries. According to the OSHA definition, pinch points are points on presses and other workplace equipment where workers could get a finger or other body part caught between two moving parts. The OSHA warns that pinch points can cause severe injuries, including amputation, and regulates work practices for workers exposed to pinch points.


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Portable Fire Extinguishers V2.16 Course

Portable Fire Extinguisher - This course explains the placement, use, maintenance, and testing of portable fire extinguishers provided for the use of employees. Paragraph (d) of this section does not apply to extinguishers provided for employee use on the outside of workplace buildings or structures. Where extinguishers are provided but are not intended for employee use and the employer has an emergency action plan and a fire prevention plan that meet the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.38 and 29 CFR 1910.39 respectively, then only the requirements of paragraphs (e) and (f) of this section apply.


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Powered Platforms V2.6 Course

Powered Platforms, Manlifts, and Vehicle-Mounted Work Platforms - Powered Platforms §1910.66 (i)(1) (i) Working platforms shall be operated only by persons who are proficient in the operation, safe use and inspection of the particular working platform to be operated. (ii) All employees who operate working platforms shall be trained in the following: (A) Recognition of, and preventive measures for, the safety hazards associated with their individual work tasks. (B) General recognition and prevention of safety hazards associated with the use of working platforms, including the provisions in the section relating to the particular working platform to be operated. (C) Emergency action plan procedures required in paragraph (e)(9) of this section. (D) Work procedures required in paragraph (i)(1)(iv) of this section. (E) Personal fall arrest system inspection, care, use and system performance. (iii) Training of employees in the operation and inspection of working platforms shall be done by a competent person. (iv) Written work procedures for the operation, safe use and inspection of working platforms shall be provided for employee training. Pictorial methods of instruction, may be used, in lieu of written work procedures, if employee communication is improved using this method. The operating manuals supplied by manufacturers for platform system components can serve as the basis for these procedures. (v) The employer shall certify that employees have been trained in operating and inspecting a working platform by preparing a certification record which includes the identity of the person trained, the signature of the employer or the person who conducted the training and the date that training was completed. The certification record shall be prepared at the completion of the training required in paragraph (i)(1)(ii) of this section, and shall be maintained in a file for the duration of the employee's employment. The certification record shall be kept readily available for review by the Assistant Secretary of Labor or the Assistant Secretary's representative.


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PPE & You V2.16 Course

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) - OSHA requires the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce employee exposure to hazards when engineering and administrative controls are not feasible or effective in reducing these exposures to acceptable levels. Employers are required to determine if PPE should be used to protect their workers.


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Progressive Discipline V2.16 Course

Federal OSHA does not specifically require discipline for an employee who violates company safety rules or OSHA regulations. That said, OSHA does seem to encourage disciplinary enforcement of employee safety violations through programs like VPP. Some states have their own safety and health laws and enforcement agencies that may have a requirement for disciplinary action, and you should verify that in the state at issue. Also, state workers compensation laws may have a penalty (reduction of benefits) for employees who are injured as a result of violating a known, posted safety rule. This varies from state to state.


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PSM and Methods V2.6 Course

PSM - Unexpected releases of toxic, reactive, or flammable liquids and gases in processes involving highly hazardous chemicals have been reported for many years in various industries that use chemicals with such properties. Regardless of the industry that uses these highly hazardous chemicals, there is a potential for an accidental release any time they are not properly controlled, creating the possibility of disaster.


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Respiratory Safety V2.16 Course

Respiratory Safety - In the control of those occupational diseases caused by breathing air contaminated with harmful dusts, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, smokes, sprays, or vapors, the primary objective shall be to prevent atmospheric contamination. This shall be accomplished as far as feasible by accepted engineering control measures (for example, enclosure or confinement of the operation, general and local ventilation, and substitution of less toxic materials). When effective engineering controls are not feasible, or while they are being instituted, appropriate respirators shall be used pursuant to this section.


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Return to Work V2.16 Course

An organization's workforce is its most valuable asset. And when an employee can't work due to illness or injury, it impacts not only an organization's productivity, but also its morale.


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Rigging Safety V2.16 Course

Rigging - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is a U.S. government organization responsible for protecting workers' safety rights. It was developed in 1970 by the OSH Act, the goal of which was to reduce work-related injuries and deaths. Standards developed by OSHA are strictly enforced, with heavy financial penalties for those found not complying. Regulations are numerous in health care and manufacturing but especially stringent in the construction field, where workers face a large variety of potential hazards each day. One of the biggest dangers on the construction field is the operation of rigging equipment. Rigging involves the use of cranes and other large pieces of equipment to lift steel and other materials to upper levels of the building. This practice is heavily regulated by OSHA, and rules and regulations to construction rigging can be found in OSHA Standard 1926.


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Root Cause V2.16 Course

Thousands of accidents occur throughout the United States every day. Accident investigations determine how and why these accidents occur. By using the information gained through an investigation, a similar or perhaps more disastrous accident may be prevented. Accident investigations should always be conducted with prevention in mind. This course will introduce basic accident investigation procedures, root cause analysis, and accident analysis techniques.


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Safety Attitudes and Actions V2.16 Course

Safety Attitude - Before safety comes safety attitude. The articles here will show you how to build it, and maintain it when you do. We’ll talk motivation technique, incentives, employee contests, recognition programs, and other safety awareness methods.


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Safety Housekeeping V2.16 Course

OSHA housekeeping rules (29 CFR 1910.22) state that "all places of employment, passageways, storerooms, and service rooms should be kept clean and orderly and in a sanitary condition." The regulation makes specific mention of keeping floors clean and dry: "To facilitate cleaning, every floor, working place, and passageway shall be kept free from protruding nails, splinters, holes, or loose boards." The regulation also says that "aisles and passageways shall be kept clear and in good repair."  


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Safety Signs and Tags V2.16 Course

Signs & Tags: Signs and symbols required by this subpart shall be visible at all times when work is being performed, and shall be removed or covered promptly when the hazards no longer exist.


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Scaffolding Safety V2.6 Course

Scaffolds: The Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) reported 54 fatalities occurred in the year 2009 from scaffolds, staging. In a Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) study, 72% of workers injured in scaffold accidents attributed the accident either to the planking or support giving way, or to the employee slipping or being struck by a falling object. All of these can be controlled by compliance with OSHA standards.


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Sexual Harassment in the Workplace V2.6 Course

FCC: Unlawful harassment is a form of discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and other federal authority. Unwelcome verbal or physical conduct based on race, color, religion, sex (whether or not of a sexual nature and including same-gender harassment and gender identity harassment), national origin, age (40 and over), disability (mental or physical), sexual orientation, or retaliation (sometimes collectively referred to as “legally protected characteristics”) constitutes harassment when: The conduct is sufficiently severe or pervasive to create a hostile work environment; or A supervisor’s harassing conduct results in a tangible change in an employee’s employment status or benefits (for example, demotion, termination, failure to promote, etc.).


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Short Service Employee V2.6 Course

This program explains guidelines for a Short Service Employee Program to appropriately supervise, train and monitor new experienced and inexperienced employees.


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Silica Exposure Awareness V2.6 Course

Silica Awareness : Silicosis has been a recognized disease process for over 400 years.Agricola in his Treatise on Mining, written in 1556 described a pulmonary disease afflicting stonecutters and miners and later by Ramazzini in 1713.Technological advances in the last century, have dramatically increased the dust exposure to the worker due to the high pressure power and air equipment used to in mining, sandblasting and other industrial settings.


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Slips Trips Falls V2.6 Course

Slips Trips Falls: Although some workplace slips, trips and falls are not serious accidents, statistics show that nonfatal slips, trips and falls account for approximately 20% of all injuries involving lost workdays. In fact, According to the National Safety Council’s Accident Facts (1995 edition is the most recent for which data is conclusive) slips, trips and falls rank as the fourth leading cause of fatal injuries to American Workers!


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SPCC Plan V2.6 Course

40 CFR 112.1 – 112.15 (Subparts A-C) -This set of regulations establish the Spill Prevention, Containment, and Countermeasures (SPCC) rule. They establish procedures, methods, equipment, and other requirements to prevent the discharge of oil from non-transportation-related onshore and offshore facilities into or upon the navigable waters of the United States or adjoining shorelines, or into or upon the waters of the contiguous zone. This rule applies to any owner or operator of a non-transportation-related onshore or offshore facility engaged in drilling, producing, gathering, storing, processing, refining, transferring, distributing, using, or consuming oil and oil products, which due to its location, could reasonably be expected to discharge oil in quantities that may be “harmful.” Generally interpreted as “leave a sheen."


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Stairs and Ladders V2.6 Course

Stairs & Ladders 1926.851(a) Only those stairways, passageways, and ladders, designated as means of access to the structure of a building, shall be used. Other access ways shall be entirely closed at all times. 1926.851(b) All stairs, passageways, ladders and incidental equipment thereto, which are covered by this section, shall be periodically inspected and maintained in a clean safe condition.


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Stop Work V2.6 Course

Stop Work Authority establishes the ‘authority and obligation’ of any individual to suspend a single work task or group operation when the control of HSE risk is not clearly established or understood. In general terms, the SWA process involves a stop, notify, correct and resume approach for the resolution of a perceived unsafe condition, act, error, omission, or lack of understanding that could result in a undesirable event.


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Stormwater Pollution Prevention Training V2.6 Course

Stormwater  is water that originates during precipitation events. It may also be used to apply to water that originates with snowmelt that enters the stormwater system. Stormwater that does not soak into the ground becomes surface runoff, which either flows directly into surface waterways or is channeled into storm sewers, which eventually discharge to surface waters.


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Subcontractor Management V2.6 Course

Subcontractor Management: OSHA Challenge provides interested employers and workers the opportunity to gain assistance in improving their safety and health management systems. Challenge Administrators experienced in safety and health guide Challenge Participants through a three-stage process to implement an effective system to prevent fatalities, injuries, and illnesses. An electronic tool is provided which breaks down the actions, documentation, and results desired. Graduates of OSHA Challenge receive recognition from OSHA as they incrementally improve their safety and health management systems. OSHA Challenge is available to general industry and construction employers in the private and public sectors under OSHA's federal jurisdiction.


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The Supervisor's Role in Safety V2.6 Course

As an "agent of the employer" the supervisor assumes the responsibilities of the employer to the degree he or she has been given authority. This first module will introduce you to some of the basic employer responsibilities to OSHA law, and the obligations the employer and employees have to each other. Fulfilling these obligations is a function of competent management and leadership: the theme throughout the entire course.


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Toxic Metal - LEAD V2.16 Course

Lead overexposure is one of the most common overexposures found in industry and is a leading cause of workplace illness. Therefore, OSHA has established the reduction of lead exposure to be a high strategic priority. OSHA's five year strategic plan sets a performance goal of a 15% reduction in the average severity of lead exposure or employee blood lead levels in selected industries and workplaces.


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Toxic Metal Hazards Chromium V2.6 Course

Chromium hexavalent (CrVI) compounds, often called hexavalent chromium, exist in several forms. Industrial uses of hexavalent chromium compounds include chromate pigments in dyes, paints, inks, and plastics; chromates added as anticorrosive agents to paints, primers, and other surface coatings; and chromic acid electroplated onto metal parts to provide a decorative or protective coating. Hexavalent chromium can also be formed when performing "hot work" such as welding on stainless steel or melting chromium metal. In these situations the chromium is not originally hexavalent, but the high temperatures involved in the process result in oxidation that converts the chromium to a hexavalent state.


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Train the Trainer Course V2.6 Course

Train the Trainer Overview Courses/Programs: Use to apply for a new course, renew/ modify an existing course, or update training provider contact information. Instructors: Use when schools want to add an instructor to an existing course or program. Proctors: Use when schools want to add a proctor to an existing course or program. Designated Examiners: Use to apply as a new designated examiner or to renew/ modify an existing designated examiner. Qualified Assessors: Use to apply as a new qualified assessor or to renew/modify an existing qualified assessor.


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Trenching Excavation and Shoring V2.6 Course

Trenching & Shoring - Excavating is recognized as one of the most hazardous construction operations. OSHA revised Subpart P, Excavations, of 29 CFR 1926.650, 29 CFR 1926.651, and 29 CFR 1926.652 to make the standard easier to understand, permit the use of performance criteria where possible, and provide construction employers with options when classifying soil and selecting employee protection methods.


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Universal Waste V2.6 Course

Universal waste is a category of waste materials designated as "hazardous waste", but containing materials that are very common. It is defined in 40 C.F.R.273.9, by the United States Environmental Protection Agency but states may also have corollary regulations regarding these materials.


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Walking Working Surface V2.6 Course

Walking Working Surfaces: Slips, trips, and falls constitute the majority of general industry accidents. They cause 15% of all accidental deaths, and are second only to motor vehicles as a cause of fatalities. The OSHA standards for walking/working surfaces apply to all permanent places of employment, except where only domestic, mining, or agricultural work is performed.


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Warehouse Safety V2.6 Course

The safety program at many companies focuses on the manufacturing or production areas because of the heavy use of machinery, equipment, chemical use, etc., and the hazards of the warehouse area may seem to be less important. However, that should not be the case. The warehouse has many of the same hazards and potential for injury as production areas. In fact, the warehouse has some hazards that do not exist in production areas, such as loading docks. In this training session we will focus on the hazards of material handling as well as other warehouse specific hazards. Once we understand these hazards, we can work to prevent injuries.


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Waste Management Training V2.6 Course

Waste management is the collection, transport, processing or disposal, managing and monitoring of waste materials. The term usually relates to materials produced by human activity, and the process is generally undertaken to reduce their effect on health, the environment or aesthetics. Waste management is a distinct practice from resource recovery which focuses on delaying the rate of consumption of natural resources. All waste materials, whether they are solid, liquid, gaseous or radioactive fall within the remit of waste management.    


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Welding and Brazing V2.6 Course

Welding & Brazing - Welding, cutting, and brazing are hazardous activities that pose a unique combination of both safety and health risks to more than 500,000 workers in a wide variety of industries. The risk from fatal injuries alone is more than four deaths per thousand workers over a working lifetime.


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Working Alone V2.16 Course

Working Alone - Monitoring and managing the safe behavior of a workforce can be a difficult task, even in an enclosed environment. Yet employees who work autonomously create even greater challenges for safety managers and workplace supervisors.


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Working with Benzene V2.6 Course

Benzene is a component of products derived from coal and petroleum and is found in gasoline and other fuels. Benzene is used in the manufacture of plastics, detergents, pesticides, and other chemicals. Research has shown benzene to be a carcinogen (cancer-causing). With exposures from less than five years to more than 30 years, individuals have developed, and died from, leukemia. Long-term exposure may affect bone marrow and blood production. Short-term exposure to high levels of benzene can cause drowsiness, dizziness, unconsciousness, and death.


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Workplace Violence V2.6 Course

Workplace violence is any act or threat of physical violence, harassment, intimidation, or other threatening disruptive behavior that occurs at the work site. It ranges from threats and verbal abuse to physical assaults and even homicide. It can affect and involve employees, clients, customers and visitors. Homicide is currently the fourth-leading cause of fatal occupational injuries in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), of the 4,547 fatal workplace injuries that occurred in the United States in 2010, 506 were workplace homicides. Homicide is the leading cause of death for women in the workplace.


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Your Basic Company Policies V2.16 Course

Basic Policies which most firms have to comply:HR, OSHA, Drug & Alcohol etc.